43 reasons why he'll win at least one more major | News Coverage from USA

43 reasons why he’ll win at least one more major

Happy birthday, Tiger Woods.

The 14-time major champion turns 43 years old today, and while the 80-time PGA Tour winner isn’t nearly as young as he used to be, his 2018 comeback showed he still has plenty of game.

In light of his 43rd birthday, using stats and past performances, we compiled 43 reasons why you can expect the Big Cat to win a 15th major title and take one step closer to Jack Nicklaus’ record of 18.

1. The U.S. Open will be played at Pebble Beach in 2019 and again in 2027. Woods won the U.S. Open at Pebble back in 2000.

2. He also won the Pebble Beach Pro-Am in the same year.

3. Woods is an eight-time PGA Tour winner at Torrey Pines, including the 2008 U.S. Open. The event goes back to San Diego in 2021.

4. At the 1999 Ryder Cup “Battle of Brookline,” Woods certainly wasn’t at his best, going just 2-3 in his five matches. That said, he did win his singles match 3&2 against Andrew Coltart. The Country Club in Brookline, Mass. hosts the U.S. Open in 2022. 

5. While Tiger didn’t get the job done with a win at the 2005 U.S. Open at Pinehurst No. 2, he did finish as the runner-up. Pinehurst will play host again in 2024.

6. Same goes for Oakmont, where Woods finished runner-up in 2007. Oakmont hosts in 2025.

7. Woods won the 2000 PGA Championship at Valhalla. The event returns in 2024.

8. At the 2018 BMW Championship, Woods tied the course record at Aronimink with a 62. He finished T6. The 2026 PGA Championship will be played at Aronimink.

9. Tom Watson lost the 2009 Open Championship in a playoff at 59 years old. In 2031, the PGA Championship goes to Congressional, where Woods won the AT&T National in 2009 and 2012. Then, Woods will be 55, so we’re saying there’s a chance.

10. Two of Tiger’s three Open Championship victories came at the Old Course in St Andrews, Scotland. The Old Course plays host to The Open in 2021.

11. Woods doesn’t have a deep history at Royal St. George’s, The Open host in 2020, but he did finish T3 there in 2003.

12. Woods won the U.S. Open at Bethpage Black in 2002. The course will play host to the 2019 PGA Championship.

13. In 2020, San Francisco’s TPC Harding Park will host the PGA Championship. Back in 2009, it hosted the Presidents Cup where the U.S. won 19.5-14.5. Woods was a perfect 5-0 in the event, including a singles match win 6&5 vs. Y.E. Yang.

14. Oh yeah, he also won the WGC American Express Championship at Harding Park in 2005.

In 18 PGA Tour events last season, Woods …

15. Ended his full comeback year with a dramatic win at the Tour Championship.

16. Had two second place finishes, one of them at the PGA Championship.

17. Logged seven top 10 finishes.

18. Finished in the top 25 12 times.

19. Only missed two cuts (Genesis Open and U.S. Open)

20. Didn’t withdraw from any event, which speaks to his health and strength. 

21. Began last season 1,199th in the Official World Golf Rankings. He’s now ranked No. 13.

As the great theologian Jay-Z once said, “men lie, women lie, numbers don’t.” Woods finished 2018 … 

22. Third in Strokes Gained: approaching the green.

23. 11th in SG: around the green.

24. Eighth in SG: tee to green.

25. Fifth in SG: total.

26. 15th in birdie average, carding 4.03 per round.

27. Seventh in scoring average, shooting 69.350. 

28. 16th in proximity to the hole, averaging 34′ 4″.

29. Third in approaches from 50-75 yards.

30. Fourth in approaches from 75-100 yards.

31. Third in approaches from 50-125 yards.

32. Ninth in approaches from 125-150 yards.

33. Second in approaches from 175-200 yards.

34. Fifth in approaches from 75-100 yards from the rough.

35. Fourth in scrambling.

36. Fifth in scrambling from 10-20 yards.

In other words, Woods had a great feel for his short game and was dialed in around and approaching the greens for most of last season.

37. Eighth in one-putt percentage.

38. Fourth in putts per round (during the first round of a tournament).

39. Fourth in putting from 15-20 feet

40. First in Round 3 scoring average — Nobody is better at positioning themselves for a Sunday charge on Saturday, aka moving day.

41. Second in front 9 scoring, averaging a score of 34.32.

42. Fifth in par 4 scoring average. On the flip side, he was 110th on par 3’s.

43. 24th on par 5 scoring. Sure, 24th isn’t too high on the list, but that number may be a bit misleading. Woods improved towards the end of year on the longer holes once he figured out his driver, and he’ll need to capitalize on his length and be more consistent with the big stick in 2019.

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